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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,
New to this forum, so here goes. I own a 240 GL, 1987 model with B230F engine and the L.H. fuel injection system.
The problem I,m having is starting the vehicle after being parked up overnight. The engine cranks, fires the dies. Then cranks and runs fine from then on. Always starts when hot.
Had the return hose off the regulator, and with the key turned to the "on" position, there is non fuel at that point.
By bridging the number 6 fuse to number 4, and activating the fuel-pump, (can hear it tic-ticking), fuel pressure is restored, and the engine starts fine on first start up.
Question is, should the fuel pump activate when the key is turned to the "on" position, or only when the key is turned further to "cranking" position?

I assume the wiring must be OK to, and the earth good at the pump, since I can hear it working. Any ideas?
Thanks in advance for any help here,
regards Masseynut.
 

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I'm no mechanic, but have the fuel pump on ONLY during start position would pose a problem as no fuel would be pumping after start motor is disengaged. I'm thinking common sense, but could be wrong. I'm new to Volvo's, but I'm really liking them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yes, I would think the same, but maybe on-board computer receives a message to keep circuit "powered" after cranking and starting. There's definately no power at no. 4 fuse, (fuel tank pre-pump), with the key turned to "on" position. Doesn't make sense. Thanks for your reply,
regards, Evan.
 

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I'm not inclined to think the computer. No power is no power. First things first, did you check for voltage at fuse block #4? Did you replace the fuse? If no power is present, check the ignition switch. Power comes from the switch to the fuse block.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Hi, thanks to everyone that has replied to my original posting. I have sorted out the problem.
I established that the pre-pump/ main pumps only receive power when the engine is being cranked.
Then, by accident, I happened to notice a mix of air in the fuel, when I had removed the fuel supply line from the injector rail on top of the engine.
So I figured that somewhere on the suction side of the main pump, there must be a loose connection or a split/perished hose, or something similar. All external hoses checked out OK.
So then I removed the pre-pump/ sender unit from the tank. The filter(sock) on the pick-up pipe was squashed flat from sitting on the bottom of the tank, as well as a small split in the little connecting pipe on the pre-pump.
As there was not a dint in the bottom of the tank in the vicinity of the pick-up, I can only think that the sock filter has been this way since new. (198,000 kms on clock now.)
I made a small plate, drilled and fitted it to "lift" the pre-pump up approximately 1 cm from it's original position, fitted a new filter, which now allows the fuel to be drawn throughout the entire filter, and replaced the small hose.
Before starting the engine I attached a pressure gauge on a tee piece, in line from the supply pipe to the fuel rail, just to check the pressure. Started engine and had 32 PSI. Left the gauge attached overnight, and checked the pressure this morning. It had dropped to 15 PSI, but, guess what!!!, the engine started perfectly, first hit!!! And idled better, and has more response when the pedal is tramped, than it's ever had.
So the problem has either been a restricted fuel supply from the filter, or it's been pulling air thru that split pipe. The pipe should have only come into play, if the fuel level had dropped below the pipe height, I would have thought.
Apologies for the long winded response, but thought you all might be interested. Thanks again for all your help,
Evan.
 
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